A different kind of ladder…a blanket ladder!

I love blankets.  I love blankets because they are warm and cozy, but I also love blankets because my husband is always hot, and our house typically resembles the frozen tundra.  So not only do I love blankets, but I need blankets.

We have a few blankets hanging around our living room, and I am always folding them and trying to arrange them so they don’t look messy.  I also have a few blankets that are special to me, that have just been hanging out in a cabinet, because I don’t have anywhere to put them.  I started looking around for a remedy for this, and found a blanket ladder that I loved at Pottery Barn, but I did not love the $179 price tag.  I did some more research, and found there were plenty of tutorials. Colby and I looked at them, and decided to come up with our own version of a blanket ladder. Here we go!

Supply List:
2 Common Boards (ours were: 3 1/2 inch x 3/4 inch x 84 inches)
4 Dowels (ours were: 3/4 inch rounds)
Gorilla Glue
Stain (we used my favorite: Minwax PolyShades in Expresso Satin)

We bought our supplies and started on this project.  We did spend a little more on the common boards than we had to, because we wanted decent quality wood since it was going to be displayed in our living room.

To start, we decided how far apart we wanted to bars that hold the blanket.  I think you should base that on your blankets and your specific needs for the project. We chose to have 4 levels, so our ladder would be able to hold four blankets.  Once we marked where the dowels needed to be, drew a line across the board, and then measured to the middle, and that’s where we drilled our hole.
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We drilled a 3/4 inch width, so the dowels will fit exactly.

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Sanding is a very important piece of this process, as the final result will show any sanding indiscretions you leave.  Sanding around the hole, as well as inside the hole is important.  We found the easiest way was by taking a drill bit, wrapping a piece of sandpaper around it, and sand inside the hole.

Once the entire piece is sanded, it’s time to insert the dowels.  The dowels fit directly into the holes, but we reinforced the fit with gorilla glue.

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Again, be sure to sand everything, including the glue spots.

From here, comes the staining.  I don’t have any pictures of this, as it’s pretty standard.  I did, however, come across a tip that may be helpful when staining.  When I went to clean out my brush, I lost my mind for a moment, and tried to “wring” out my brush, like you would a regular paint brush.  It didn’t cross my mind that stain does not react the same way as paint.  Because of this, my hands looked like this:

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This was after using hand soap, and dish detergent, in and attempt to rinse them clean. My hands were very sticky, and this stuff wasn’t budging. After my super sympathetic husband stopped laughing at me, he googled the best way to remove stain from skin. Surprisingly enough, vegetable oil did the trick. It took it right off my hands, which made me a little nervous about what it does to my french fries, but that is neither here nor there.

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I LOVE the final product.

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It holds the blankets nicely, and looks nice when they are all hanging.  Our overall cost came to about $50, which is WAY better than the Pottery Barn price.  It was also nice to determine our own dimensions, color, etc.

Overall, a simple project that has a helpful purpose as well.  Enjoy!

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